Anne Bibb is a veteran of customer care. She’s a VP global head of customer experience for Support Ninja. But before all of the customer experience, she was in customer care, she was driving the experience already from the very base of how people engage and come to know your brand. She’s really an expert at it. And she is part of the CX revolution.

Anne Bibb, VP Global Head of Customer Experience for Support Ninja

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Transcript
Anne Bibb:

catering to your customers, where they are. And that's where customer experience is going in the future,

Frank Rogers:

today we have with us Anne Bibb and Anne is a veteran of customer care. Like right now, customer experience is all the Vogue it's in her title. She's a VP global head of customer experience for Support Ninja. But before all of the customer experience, she was in customer care, she was driving the experience already from. The very base of how people engage and come to know your brand. She's really an expert at it. And she is part of, I think, the CX revolution, welcome to the show Anne Bibb

Anne Bibb:

Thanks, Frank. Thanks Kyle. Nice to be here.

Kyle Burt:

yeah, welcome, Anne. Why don't you fill some gaps from that intro for us?

Anne Bibb:

It's been a whirlwind. If someone told me that I was going to be here I would have told them that they were crazy. I started out in hospitality about 25 years ago. I actually thought I was going to go to law school, become an attorney, change the world. And while I was in school, I was working as a night auditor for a hotel and fell in love with customer support. And went from there, moved into telecom. And managed some customer support there. And then he got tired and went into the back office side of it, started doing contracts for EDS. And then took a little break and then I saw an ad in a newspaper. Actually, my dad saw an ad and he's there's this great company called Alpine access. They do work from home and I'm like, oh, these are all scams. Every single one of them. You don't, there's nothing real about any of those. And he's no, this one sounds cool. This one sounds good. So I checked it out and it was a great organization. It was one of the pioneers of work from home and. That was great ended up being there for about six years and then went over to another organization and then moved down over to Hilton, which is, the epitome of great customer experience. And and now I'm at support ninja and driving the customer experience here. So it's been quite the journey. And I can't say that I would change anything because every. Piece of it has led to where I am today.

Frank Rogers:

Anne you know, everybody Who goes through telecom, the story is always very similar. It's circuitous, nobody ever says, I will take this path. This has been a passion and a dream of mine, but it's always interesting to hear that story.

Anne Bibb:

I think if you survive it. It's one of those things that you put in your back pocket, and you can always pull something out and say, I know that I've lived the story. I've got something to tell

Frank Rogers:

that's right.

Kyle Burt:

You mentioned the Hilton being the epitome of customer experience. do you think that is?

Anne Bibb:

because for two reasons, one Hilton is phenomenal at putting their employees first. The w when I was there we always made sure that take care of our employees no matter what, and always taken care of, thinking about our customers as well, putting employees and customers at the forefront of every decision that we made. Yeah today through the pandemic, you can see that they're still thinking about everything that they're doing, making sure that those little stickers are on the doors that you can tell if somebody's entered your room. Everything about the customer is being thought through at every little step of that customer journey.

Frank Rogers:

So how has that shaped your view and your leadership as you approach CX initiatives?

Anne Bibb:

when I think about CX, I think about everything from, I think of it starting with even the hiring process of an employee's candidate journey, what am I doing to make that candidate hiring experience a comfortable one and something that I would want to do, Whenever I was looking at high being hired myself. I really enjoyed the actual experience of who I was talking to what happened throughout the process. And every individual that I met at the organization, was it the right culture that I wanted to actually be part of? I've seen organizations make it incredibly difficult. To join it a company is that candidate experience something that is a good one or a bad one. It really starts there. And then once you become a part of that organization, what is that employee experience like? The employee experience really translates fully into the customer experience

Frank Rogers:

So would you say that, would you say that like setting expectations is a big part of customer experience?

Anne Bibb:

Oh 100%. If you're not talking to your employees and making sure that they understand what they're getting into, if they don't know what they're getting into from the moment that they walk in that door, what am I supposed to be doing? Who am I working for? What are my job responsibilities? What are my expectations? They're not going to perform them and then they're going to be unhappy. And then that's going to translate into what the end customer experience is going to be then. But let's just not talk about that expectations on the customer side as well.

Frank Rogers:

That's right.

Anne Bibb:

So you've got that translation from setting expectations to your employees, but also setting expectations for your customers.

Frank Rogers:

Yeah. And that goes everywhere. Doesn't it like marketing, into the sales team, down into implementation into customer support. Like how many, like how much of your time do you spend on making sure that those balls are not dropped as they move across the organization? These expectation balls.

Anne Bibb:

absolutely. Whenever you are not communicating. On both ends. It's the client side and the vendor side as well. Both sides have to make sure that there's clear communication and expectations on both sides. If you don't know if you haven't set those expectations on both sides, then they're not going to be met proper boundaries, proper expectations. That's the epitome and the key to success.

Kyle Burt:

Yeah. And I think it's interesting that you draw the parallel there. Not the parallel, but you make the point of customer experience starts at the candidate experience level. That's a new idea to me. I haven't heard of that before but it makes sense. You start with the candidate experience. If it's really hard to go through the process of trying to work for the company. And if that's a terrible process that actually is going to ding. My view of that brand, right? I'm a candidate.

Anne Bibb:

We're going to hire the right people and hiring the right person into the company and hiring the right person for the job. Is the most important thing, because then that job's going to get done correctly and that individual is going to be happy and the end customer is going to have the good risk, the perfect result, but you're not going to get the right person. If you don't have a good candidate experience, they're going to get frustrated.

Frank Rogers:

Yeah, we're focusing on an interesting part here, right? Cause there's like a technology aspect to all of this and a functional and a process aspect, but the people aspect of it has to be like an equal weight and measure. And as you talk about the hiring, would you say like when you're looking at a candidate, it's not just, will they. Be able to fulfill on our mission, like our culture. Do you also look at the fact that because things are evolving so fast that will this human also help evolve our culture?

Anne Bibb:

absolutely. But you just called out something. You're talking about the people, it's the people, the process and the technology. And part of that is are they flexible in today's world? Look at how much we've changed. In the last 18 to 24 months. And the people that have been the most successful are the people that have been able to change with it.

Frank Rogers:

The adaptable.

Anne Bibb:

The adaptable 100%.

Kyle Burt:

so I am talking about that adaptability. Can you tell us a little story about, how you had to go through that and then this last year with your

Anne Bibb:

Oh, absolutely. I. As many people was in the hospitality industry. And as many people, thousands of individuals was furloughed during the pandemic transitioned seamlessly into consulting and ended up here. Oh, after several months and I'm thrilled, this is a great organization and could not be happier, but it goes to that adaptability, right? There are many individuals who are still hunting that are still searching and. Along those lines. I've talked to many individuals even over the last couple of months that are stuck. They're just stuck in the way of the world as it was. They are not willing to look at the possibility of where the world is going. I know, not to toot our own horn, but what support ninja is we are an outsourcing organization, a BPO, if you will, that is we challenge the status quo of what a BPO is. We like to be much more transparent with our clients than what a typical BPO is. The are our clients have much more access to our frontline ninjas. All of us are ninjas. I'm an ninja, our CEO's a ninja. Every support ninja is a ninja. We're not agents, but the gist of it is we're just not the typical outsourcer. And whenever you. Look at what we're trying to accomplish when we're bringing a candidate in, what we're looking for is that flexibility. We're bringing in people that have a lot of experience in BPO. How ever, I don't want somebody that's so stuck in what an outsourcer. Yeah, is that they can't think of the flexibility and what it could be like, let's take the best of what has happened over the last 30, 40, 50 years in this industry, but let's change it up. Let's break it and put it back together. But that's going to that adaptability and that candidate and who we're looking for. And. The people in this world that have been through and six have been successful over the last 18 months or individuals, not just in this industry, but really in any industry that have said, okay, so that happened, right? A pandemic just hit the entire world.

Frank Rogers:

yeah.

Anne Bibb:

can we do in order to overcome what just happened? The pandemic hit the restaurant industry. The organizations that survived figured out. Okay we can't have people coming in, but we can deliver. They figured out how to cater to their customers over a period of time that they couldn't just do what they'd always done. They changed it up. And that's about going to the customer experience, getting to the customers where they are. And that's where customer experience is going in the future, catering to your customers, where they are.

Frank Rogers:

Yeah, and I think that adaptability, at the organizational level, at the people level and. And the fact that if we look at 2020, there was a low tide and we saw what was at the bottom. There was a lot of really old paradigms that we just got up each day and put on and carried forward of the things that you quote throughout the window last year, maybe this year, what are some of the things that you got rid of to be able to move forward?

Anne Bibb:

I think it's the preconceived notion of what work is, like what has worked from home? What has worked from the office? What does hybrid, what is work? We all had to change it. We all had to figure it out.

Frank Rogers:

We came up with a word here this last week. And to be quite honest, Kyle, and I can't even remember or figure out how we even came to this word. Did you type that in? Did I type it in? We have no idea, but the word is hybridity.

Anne Bibb:

Hi,

Frank Rogers:

we're not quite sure how to use it in a sentence yet. We're working on it. This is an evolution but but we are in that sense of. Transition to something that is a place we have not been before. And so it is like this redefinition, which is on one hand for many people, frightening on the other hand, really exciting. When it comes to that this hybridity, what what's your approach? How are you leaning into this?

Anne Bibb:

I think it's very interesting really, and I'm, I really would love to hear the definition of what you think hybridity is. Honestly, everybody has a different definition of hybrid and I'm intrigued by that because there's work from home. Everybody knows what work from home is. Everybody knows what work from anywhere is. Everybody knows what work from the office is, but everybody has a different definition of what hybrid is.

Frank Rogers:

Yeah. And we really think that it's, that we flip that word around. We say, are we living at work? Is there something like, we work from home, but. Are we living at work? Is work becoming a lifestyle in this whole process and how do we treat that and deal with that. And flex with that, it opens up so many opportunities, but also just a challenge for people that have, a top-down thought process, a command and control process, what are people doing, for those, that lack of measurement. It's frightening. Like it seems to me that you are all in, on work from home, this hybridity and are there certain things that you're incorporating into your plan that you're saying, Hey, this we're going to do these things differently.

Anne Bibb:

so I, as an individual am all in, on work from home because I've worked from home. For more than 20 years, I'm successful at it. I have a room that I've turned into an office as an employer. I am all in, on being an employee advocate. I think that's an important distinction

Frank Rogers:

Yes. Yes.

Anne Bibb:

because when I'm hiring somebody. When I'm bringing in, when I'm talking to an employee, I want to make sure that I understand what, where they're going to be successful. The reason is there are some people that are not successful at home. I have an employee that had to move at home because of the pandemic recently had a conversation with him and he's as soon as I can. I really need to go back to the office. This is not working for me. I have a baby at home. I love her. I cannot do this anymore. This is not for me. When can I go back to the office? I need to have that structure. That is where I'm going to be most successful. I've had another employee that's can I go to the office two days a week? And then I have yet another one that's I love this. I am more successful here than I have been in years and not three very different types of employees but I want them all to be successful. So when the time comes, we're going to figure out how can he go back to the office? What is going to, what are we going to need to do to make that work with the other one? How can we make it so that she can go to the office two days a week, the days that she has deemed that's what she wants to do. And the other one? Yes, absolutely. You can work from home permanently. That's how you want to work. But that is, I think the important distinction that we need to make. From an employee first organization in order to make sure that they're getting what they need in order to be successful. And that's going to translate down into that customer experience because they're going to be happy. They're going to be successful. That experience is going to turn around and they're going to provide the best end customer experience to those customers.

Kyle Burt:

Yeah, no, that's great. I think we need a big plaque right across every organization that says work is not a place, That's really what we're talking about here. Work is not place and having flexibility. and the challenges that presents to you as a leader how do you manage, three different employee types. One wants to work fully at home. Once they're at full at the office and the middle one wants to work, maybe one, two, three days a week in the office. So that hybridity, that's what that is.

Frank Rogers:

When you look at customer experience, we always start kinda like developing software. We, we start with a user story if we took that approach across our organizations we started with user stories. If we looked at like we did with marketing our own people, like personas here are the personas in our business. And we started to architect from the inside out. We would end up with a very different looking organization. Our space would look different. And it would probably have less pretense and more functionality. You would intentionally think about what does it mean to be together? Cause we're talking to people right now and it's blowing their minds getting back together. Intentionality is everything. Are you working closely with people inside of your business around how you're architecting that space?

Anne Bibb:

That is on the plan and on the forefront for the coming months and year of how do we move forward? We are opening actually another site in a different city. And as we moved that up, how are we building that out? Because to your point, being intentional, as we look at that, how many of those are going to be seats? How much of that is going to be social space? How much of that is going to be hot seating? How much of that is going to be dedicated seating? So that is all part of our new street strategy and strategic planning of we've really got to sit down and think about how we're moving forward. As we look at this because. Previously, it would have been okay. Let's fit as many seats into this building as we possibly can. And now it is okay. Now we really need to review this. We really need to think about what we want to do here even with, our us team. You're right. This was the first, last week was the first time that I had this many people together in a spot. It was great. We were all vaccinated. We all got to spend time together. We did a team building event, but it was overwhelming. I have to say the emotional drainage that happened from being actually in person for the first time in forever was more exhausting than the actual work that I had done preparing for it the week before.

Frank Rogers:

I can imagine lots of high-fives and uncomfortably long hugs.

Anne Bibb:

That and just the engagement the whole social aspect. We've forgotten how to socialize.

Frank Rogers:

We have yes. We're out of practice.

Anne Bibb:

We are completely out of practice. You're using a new social muscle that you haven't used in awhile. This, what we're doing today is just not the same thing.

Frank Rogers:

Yeah. there's probably a certain level of awkwardness,

Anne Bibb:

it is. And you have to remember you can't do certain things in person.

Kyle Burt:

starters, you Got to wear pants, right?

Anne Bibb:

I have to wear pants. Kyle, I have to remind you go. Don't forget to put those on before you leave the house.

Frank Rogers:

we call that the COVID mullet, you're essentially like very professional on top, but you're pretty loose, waist down, like you got some board shorts on and some, strange looking sandals that look like maybe they belong somewhere else. it's a different universe and you can't carry that into the office.

Anne Bibb:

it is. And you just don't use the awkward silences. It was fun, but it was, it's going to take some time to get used to being around people again, in a good way, in a very good way.

Frank Rogers:

Yeah humor is coming back, I believe in a big way as well right along with that. So as you look at, this, it seems like right now, like with this intentionality, like the next, six to 12 months for you is you're working across the team across functions inside of your businesses. Do you find that this has created more of a. Cross-functional collaboration around customer experience. So you find that people are getting, in your boat that you've been rolling along inside the business for a while that they're wanting seats at the table.

Anne Bibb:

in a good way. Very much. We have to be cross-functionally collaborative in order to be successful in this business. And so that's a good thing that we are collaborating in that way to move forward.

Frank Rogers:

Yeah. That's awesome. That's fantastic.

Kyle Burt:

Yeah, and you mentioned something last time support ninja being an employee first company, right? And you mentioned a story of during when COVID first happened that what Support Ninja did to the families of support and to staff. Can you share that story?

Anne Bibb:

absolutely. I. When the pandemic hit, there were a lot of organizations touting that they were employee first and that they were making sure that people got computers and they could keep working. And, and I was thinking to myself, that's great. You're keeping your business up and running. That's wonderful. But to me, that wasn't really employee first because they were keeping their business functioning. It was great that they were keeping their employees the ability to keep working. What stood out to me about support ninja was more that when they got the news that the Philippines was going to shut down and it was going to be 24 hours, it ended up being more like six hours And they had to move very quickly. It wasn't so much making sure that they got computers home and they distributed all of the equipment, although they did do that. It was also, gosh we don't really know when the people are going to be able to get to the grocery store again, or when grocery stores are going to open back up or we don't know what the world is going to look like for the next. Two three weeks month. So let's go ahead and make sure that everybody has enough money to get to the grocery store, make sure that they're stocked up, make sure that they have food, not just for them, but their families. And so when I heard that, I was thinking, gosh, not only did they actually make sure that they had a computer could keep working, make sure that they had a hotspot so that their wifi was working, but they also fed the people. They literally made sure that their people and their families had food for those that couldn't get home because of the timing, they made sure that we had beds at the office. They made sure we had, they ran the store, they got computer gaming systems and made sure that there were stuff to do at the office. So they weren't just sleeping and everything there, there was activities. It was literally making sure that everybody was taken care of from food to activity and places to sleep. And it was to me actually putting people first and their families as well. So that was just above and beyond. And I had not heard of any other outsourcers that did that to that extreme. And that to me was an employee first moment.

Kyle Burt:

wow.

Frank Rogers:

you want to talk about customer loyalty? That is an anchoring type of experience for everybody there. And I think whenever leadership can talk about things like that, it's the, talk about it and then experience it, that reinforces it. And so that is, that's one of the best stories that I've heard, through the COVID time period. And I would imagine as you've moved forward, being able to keep things operationally, lit that, that did that kind of Create like a boost, not only just in morale, but like in the kind of feedback that you get from people that people become more connected inside of the business. Yes.

Anne Bibb:

absolutely the employees, they were they to this day, they remember that they still talk about it. They're very loyal. And I've got other stories outside of that, when the Texas snow storm hit, the texts apocalypse

Kyle Burt:

I

Frank Rogers:

Ice apocalypse.

Anne Bibb:

Right and texts pocalypse. We do a daily standup here and with our us team just to make sure that we're everybody's okay. And throughout the course of the check-ins that week, you saw everybody's number of started going from like an eight to a seven by Wednesday of that week. Everybody was at three. People were without power. People were, they were cold. They were freezing. And so we decided to, everybody take Friday as a mental health day. Some of the people had been without power for several days. One of our employees in Austin had a massive truck. He drove around and picked some of our employees up, took them to the corporate office because we had power in the corporate office and made sure people had a place to sleep and food to eat. And so it's not just, in our. Call centers. It's also at our corporate office. We make sure that our people are taken care of. And that just made sure that it showed me that we've truly around the world, around the globe, not just at the beginning of the pandemic, but still today in this world are still an employee force first organization. So

Frank Rogers:

so that's got to make its way into what your customers experience, right? So like when you're, when your clients, because you have customers and then you have your customer's customers

Anne Bibb:

that's what that's isn't it filters down.

Frank Rogers:

It does. So like they hear about, they get the impact of your positive culture, reflected back on their company, for Kyle and I we've postulated this context as we talk, you talked earlier about like people process technology, which was something that kind of came up like decades ago. But now it's actually a reality. Like they are marrying together. And that we can do all these things in the customer journey to drive conversion. To get people into an engagement to amplify the engagement, but that time when they're on there with an agent or somebody who's, maybe on the sales side of the business or in the support side of the business, we call that the space in between and that space in between is impacted radically by culture. And by that, the discipline of that organization in how they approach serving the client when you're talking about, CXS got a bundle into it when you're talking about work from home. Like when you look at that space in between, what are you doing to coach up that level of impact in that precious moment to make that moment matter?

Anne Bibb:

I think it's just keeping that line of communication open on all sides. Right? Making sure that you understand the needs, the wants, and what's important to all parties and because. When you, especially when you're, you mentioned, you've got your employees, you've got your clients and then you've got their clients. There's a multi-faceted there, there are multi-layers here. And so when you talk about the space in between, there are multiple spaces in between. So when you talk about that, the needs are actually several spaces in between. So if we don't eat those lines of communication open and make sure that we have a full understanding of what the needs are, then we're not going to meet the needs. So what happens is that the client, the customers, the end customers express their needs and the client really has that view. We have to make sure that we have a full understanding from the client of what those needs are. If we haven't heard them directly from the end customer themselves. So if we don't have open and honest, transparent communication, that is where the failures are going to happen. So it is super important to make sure that is the communication. Is there. That is the key to any successful business.

Frank Rogers:

Yeah, that's awesome. Yeah. That's, you're really talking about I think the next level of CX is really talking about relationship excellence and that's really what you're talking about is, and it's, that's a squishy thing, right? If you sit down with your CFO or your COO, like you've got to say we have relationship excellence as evidenced by, and then you call out all these various different types of. Know, KPIs. What do you do to bridge that? From that like a squishy qualitative side to the quantitative side where you're keeping everybody like nodding at the same pace, what are some of the KPIs you try to bring in that? Get people thinking about, okay, this is as evidenced by the falling off.

Anne Bibb:

That is a great question. And what makes it very interesting for me is that I have 140 plus different clients and all of them have. Very different needs. So the KPIs across the board are they're different. I individually am looking at a couple of different things with regard to, an overall health score from a client perspective. My operations team is generally looking at the individual KPIs from that. What each individual client wants, right? Some of them are looking at maybe an AHT. Some of them are looking at concurrency and how many concurrent chats somebody is handling. Some of them, maybe they're not even handling chat or voice, maybe they're virtual assistants, or maybe they're coders, or maybe they're product managers, or maybe their customer success teams. We literally handle all kinds of outsourcing. So it could be. Some KPI that is out in, never land. But the operational team will be tracking those KPIs. So the operations team will tell me, are we meeting. These three to four, five KPIs, then the customer success team will basically be managing from the relationship standpoint and saying from a relationship point of view, we are in this kind of a relationship red, yellow, green here's the health score from that perspective. And so I merged the two together and look at the health score from that perspective and say, we are in a good point or not.

Frank Rogers:

gotcha. So health scoring that makes a lot of sense. And when it comes to like your group of people, your ninjas, which means like just walking out of your office and going down the hallway to go to the bathroom is fraught with peril, I would imagine. But but all these ninjas that you have right there, how many do you have? Is that like a hundred, 200, 500? How many general number of people.

Anne Bibb:

over a thousand.

Frank Rogers:

Over a thousand. So you have a thousand ninjas there, and we all know that, people are redefining the boundaries of growth and everywhere else. What is your kind of vision? What is your company's vision for growth? Do you say? We want to be at 2000 ninjas, 3000 inches by what? What is the knee? What's the knee and your back right now, pushing you forward.

Anne Bibb:

then I would like to see us at 10,000 in the next five years. That's my personal goal. And my stretch goal for that for me is I'd like to actually try and target that in the next three years, but that's an goal I'm pushing that for me personally.

Kyle Burt:

What are the things that you're going to do to get there?

Anne Bibb:

a couple of things. I've got a great sales team. I'm partnering with them as well, but also partnering with my clients to see what we can do. Together, strategic partnerships to Frank's point, that next level of relationship experience, taking those relationships, identifying those areas from that strategic partnership where we can actually take our relationship to the next level And say, we've identified this need and see what else we can do in our partnership to continue to grow. We've got some phenomenal clients and we continue to grow with each of those clients. We've got some great partnerships. That's one of the things that I, again, Because we've got such great employee experience. We provide fantastic service and each of our clients have continued to grow with us. And I look forward to growing faster.

Kyle Burt:

I love that. And so we this, talking about the people talked a little bit about process. Now what about the technology? If you look out on the horizon CX next, right? You look out on the horizon, like what has you excited out there in technology in CX

Anne Bibb:

that is a tricky question for me, Kyle, because it is moving so fast. And that's, I think one of the, I hate to say the benefits of the pandemic, but truly when you look at what happened in the last 18 months, I feel like from a technology perspective, we actually made a leap of five years in, in a lot of technological advancements. Just taking video conferencing, for instance There they're probably more competitors in that arena that have come up in the last 18 to 24 months than we ever expected to see in the next five years. Hoppin look at that, He came out of nowhere and they've grown tremendously and there are multiple competitors in that arena. there are so many technological advancements that we never saw coming. And I just think that's going to continue to grow. I think the next wave that we're going to see is, and I think Frank, you called this out a little bit ago, the advancements in the hybrid space, things that are going to help. From that area of facilities and not just that, but also how to keep people engaged equally. That's the missing component, I think right now, because over the last 18 months, there's been a lot of focus on work from home and how to engage people. Work from home, how to make sure that there's productivity in a work from home space. Everything's been worked from home and working remotely. Now, as things are opening back up, and people are going back into the office partially or in a split fashion, and people are trying to figure out what hybrid means for their organization. Employees are starting to realize. That they don't want to be there all the time or the entire team doesn't want to be there at the same time and organizations while they're realizing that they were always hybrid, let's face it. Most companies were always hybrid in some way, shape or form, but they're realizing, yeah, what they're realizing is we didn't treat our employees equally from an engagement standpoint. All of the time and we need to look at that. An example of that is when I was at an office one time and I manager said, Hey, let's all get together real quick and do a quick little side meeting and completely forgot that he had three employees that were not in the office. They were working remotely. Didn't even think about pulling them into a WebEx, zoom, an Adobe room or anything, and basically completely left them out. And nobody thought to add them. Or bring them in, or even update them about what was talked about on that meeting. So they were left out, they didn't get an update, they didn't get the information. Therefore there was no equality in that group and they were left out. Exactly. And there was, they were completely left out and it felt to them like they were not part of the team all because they didn't go into the office that day. So that is, and that was pre pandemic. So as we move forward, this is something that people are coming to realize, oh, we need to, to your point be inclusive of everybody. And these are the things that I think from a technology standpoint, people are going to start thinking about

Frank Rogers:

Yeah, you have to think through that process of how are we going to use the technologies to hit the intentionality of being inclusive and you start there, but like you like so much of and why I think Kyle and I appreciate so much of what. What you work on is that you can have these big picture thoughts, but the devil is in the details, like at some particular point in time you win the war before you fight the war. Like you have to get in the grind of understanding the details. Cause that's where you're going to lose people. By not thinking through it with the right level of detail, just like what you're talking about. There, there may not have been because there wasn't necessarily bad intentions, but there wasn't necessarily right. Direct intentions. Like we have to drive inclusivity because of the fractured nature of how people come together. We have to have build that discipline of how we do that. That's the level of detail that you go to. And once you've figured out how to do it, you have to teach it.

Anne Bibb:

and you're spot on. He, it wasn't to be spiteful, it wasn't intentional, or it was a lack of intention. That's what it was here. He wasn't trying to leave them out. He just forgot to bring them in.

Frank Rogers:

Yeah. And I think that's the key is that quote getting better, like so much. So now, like there is a destination, like your destination, I want 10,000 Dinges, but the way you get to that 10,000 ninjas is minding the process.

Anne Bibb:

you've heard the phrase live with purpose. I think that it is important to do everything with purpose, to be intentional with everything that you do, work with purpose, live with purpose, just. And to have positive intent. It is, especially whenever people are unintentionally live out left out of things. Are you sure that was intentional? Probably not. How, have a positive thought process. They've probably just forgot it. Wasn't to hurt your feelings, just have a conversation, ask them what was going on. Communicate.

Kyle Burt:

Question for you. Worst customer experience. And if you were to run that organization, like where would you start to fix it?

Anne Bibb:

We have had to replace an appliance multiple times. And just having to go through that process with a specific organization has been, an ordeal and just having to go through that is it's exhausting having, it feels like every time you have to do that, you have to escalate. Through multiple levels of management in order to just do what is on your contract. And that's a very frustrating experience from the customer's end. So that's probably the worst customer experience that I've ever had. I feel like I've been very blessed just because, and it's probably because I'm an overly positive person that. I just, I recognize that the person on the other end of the line is just doing their job. I generally don't get frustrated with them. Listen, I know you're just doing your job.

Kyle Burt:

In that example you provided, where do you think the challenge lies for them? Just, you gotta make a lot of assumptions there, but where do you think the challenge lies and what do you think would need to be fixed there?

Anne Bibb:

honestly, those that generally comes down to company policies and procedures. The individuals on the other end of the line, they're crossing their T's they're dotting their I's they're following SOP that they have been handed and told that they have to operate within those boundaries and they are not allowed to operate outside of them. They're literally just doing their job

Kyle Burt:

No flexibility.

Anne Bibb:

and you have zero flexibility. You can't get upset with them. They aren't allowed to do anything outside of those procedures. Giving your frontline reps, zero flexibility. It doesn't provide for a good customer experience at all. So you have to make a decision as an organization, what you want your customer experience to be. And that generally starts with your frontline customer support.

Frank Rogers:

As we conclude here today tell us anything about what you're working on right now, what you're doing right now. If you have anything that you're going to be writing and publishing out, should we be following you on any particular social media? How do we connect with you in a great way so that we stay in right relationship with you? Tell us about that.

Anne Bibb:

LinkedIn and Twitter are my main social media platforms. And working on a couple of blog posts right now. And then I'm just working on rebuilding my team and helping to coach them and work on those strategic partnerships with my clients. And. Go from there, but support ninja is on its way to some great things over the next couple of months. So anybody's welcome to reach out to me.

Frank Rogers:

Awesome. You represent your company well you have a beautiful, authentic, personal brand and we support your message.

Anne Bibb:

Ah, thank you, Frank. Thank you, Kyle.

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